The Problem is Religion – but not in the way we think

The terror attacks in Brussels on Tuesday have once again raised questions about the relationship between religion and violence. In today's post, Erin Wilson reflects on these issues, exploring key arguments made by Prof William Cavanaugh during his recent lecture in Groningen and book The Myth of Religious Violence.  On Tuesday this week, ISIS claimed responsibility for two …

Inviting our future: liberal de-culturalization and the Paris attacks – Part two

  “Perhaps we should ask ourselves if these people have not rather come here to save us.” (Erik Borgman)   In today’s post Ton Groeneweg continues his analysis of liberal de-culturalization as a deeper trend exposed by the responses to the attacks in Paris. In this second part of his blog, he focuses on how …

Identity, ambiguities and uncertainties: Continuing reflections after Paris, Beirut and Iraq attacks

Today's post continues our series of reflections on the attacks in Paris, Beirut and Iraq. Joram Tarusarira responds to Erin Wilson's call to accept ambiguities, posing a few problems and questions with this approach. In the wake of the attacks in Paris, Beirut and Iraq which saw many people losing their lives, an avalanche of …

Terrorism, climate change and the politics of ‘radicalization’

‘Radicalization’ is becoming an increasingly common word in contemporary politics and public discourse. Yet it crops up in seemingly unrelated contexts, most recently in Paris, in relation to both terrorism and climate change. This raises a number of questions about what or who radicalization actually refers to. Erin Wilson reflects on these ambivalent dimensions of …

Accepting Ambiguity: Being Content with Uncertainties amidst the Urge for Security

Since the events in Iraq, Beirut and Paris last week, we have all been trying to make sense of what has happened and how to respond. Over the coming weeks, The Religion Factor will be publishing reflections from staff and fellows of the Centre for Religion, Conflict and the Public Domain on these events from …

What was worse, Charlie Hebdo or Boko Haram? Religion, violence and clicktivism.

The fallout from the Charlie Hebdo attacks around the tensions between "religion" and "freedom of speech" continue to feature prominently in public debate across Europe, particularly in the aftermath of the Copenhagen cafe shooting over the weekend. But the vastly different responses to these events and the Boko Haram attacks in Nigeria raise numerous questions about …

The struggle for justice of Dutch young Muslims in Syria

“I am powerless. (...) Please do something. Do not forsake me and all the other mothers”. 18-year-old Robin converted to Islam one and a half years ago. In November he and his friend left their homes departing for Syria to take part in the armed conflict against Bashar al-Assad. Robin’s mother, Joland, is crying out for …